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Old Farm
acrylic
5 x 7 inches
click to enlarge
Snow Covered
acrylic
7 x 9 inches
sold
click to enlarge
White Cottage
acrylic
6 x 8 inches
click to enlarge
Recess Time
acrylic
6 x 8 inches
click to enlarge
South Quebec Home
acrylic
12 x 16 inches
sold
click to enlarge
Country Vista
acrylic
14 x 18 inches
click to enlarge
Children in autumn
acrylic
5 x 7 inches
click to enlarge
Winter lane
acrylic
7 x 9 inches
sold
click to enlarge
Sharon Mark

SHARON MARK - AN IDYLLIC IMAGINATION

Sharon Mark was born in the village of Ormstown, Quebec, about 60 kilometers southwest of Montreal. She presently lives in Hemmingford, Quebec, 40 kilometers east of Ormstown, near the New York border.

When she was young, Mark watched her grandmother paint the pictures that decorated the family home. She still has many of these paintings from her childhood and continues to draw inspiration from them. That she has eclipsed her grandmother’s talent is evident but we can see the source that has nurtured her self-taught career.

Sharon Mark has never formally studied art, though she has been painting for over two decades. Her technique has matured through constant application over the years. She has broadened her scope to reflect a vision that is less detail oriented but more harmonious in its totality. Her style is now more realistic and her palette has grown richer and deeper. She prefers to paint invented rather than real landscapes, sticking to a style with which she feels at ease. Among her favour artists are Grandma Moses and Maud Lewis.

Mark’s painting is almost childlike in its simplicity. She follows the tradion established by “Le Douanier”, Henri Rousseau. She finds herself identified as one of Quebec’s naïve artists, in the company of others such as Yves du Poirier, Genevieve Jost and Arthur Villeneuve. The beauty of her native southern Quebec countryside feeds Sharon Mark’s passion to paint. Her subject matter is drawn from the association of a happy rural childhood. Houses, barns, children at play, cats and dogs, snowmen, sleighs, are common elements, all set in pristine landscapes. Viewed as a whole rather than with the eye focused on detail, her paintings exude a sense of comfort and well being. Summer scenes do not figure prominently in Mark’s oeuvre. She prefers to depict the cooler, more muted seasons: autumn, winter, early spring. This preference is reflected in her palette, which is dominated by blues,